First Titanic Victim Receives Headstone After Over a Century

Titanic Victim Headstone

As the 100th anniversary of the Titanic sinking approaches, a teenage boy who died while helping to build the historic ship has finally received a headstone after residing in an unmarked grave for over a century.

The tragic fate of fifteen-year-old Samuel Scott is believed to be the first death connected to the RMS Titanic. Samuel worked at the Belfast shipyard where the Titanic was originally constructed. He accidentally fell and died of a fractured skull in April of 1910. Until recent events, however, there was nothing to indicate the location of his grave in Belfast City Cemetery.

Samuel was recently featured in a children’s book entitled “Spirit of the Titanic,” which stars Samuel’s ghost as he follows the sinking ship to the bottom of the sea. It was the book’s author, Nicola Pierce, who played a central role in the headstone installation. When Pierce wondered if there was some way the grave could be marked, the idea reached the West Belfast Festival, a community arts organization who agreed to fund the marked gravestone.

Pierce was a guest of honor at the grave marking ceremony, and Samuel’s relatives were there to greet and thank her for sharing Samuel’s story.

Titanic victim Samuel Scott’s grave marked, 101 years later [O’Brien Press]

As the 100th anniversary of the Titanic sinking approaches, a teenage boy who died while helping to build the historic ship has finally received a headstone after residing in an unmarked grave for over a century.

The tragic fate of fifteen-year-old Samuel Scott is believed to be the first death connected to the RMS Titanic. Samuel worked at the Belfast shipyard where the Titanic was originally constructed. He accidentally fell and died of a fractured skull in April of 1910. Until recent events, however, there was nothing to indicate the location of his grave in Belfast City Cemetery.

Samuel was recently featured in a children’s book entitled “Spirit of the Titanic,” which stars Samuel’s ghost as he follows the sinking ship to the bottom of the sea. It was the book’s author, Nicola Pierce, who played a central role in the headstone installation. When Pierce wondered if there was some way the grave could be marked, the idea reached the West Belfast Festival, a community arts organization who agreed to fund the marked gravestone.

Pierce was a guest of honor at the grave marking ceremony, and Samuel’s relatives were there to greet and thank her for sharing Samuel’s story.

Titanic Events: Samuel Scott Honored as 1st Victim of RMS Titanic [Suite 101]

Titanic victim Samuel Scott’s grave marked, 101 years later [O’Brien Press]

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